Canadians have been pushing the limits on their home turf for decades, but they have also been making important climbs around the world. Here are a few of the sends that made headlines in 2013.

Sarah Hueniken on Musashi

In April, 2013, Sarah Hueniken became the first North American woman to climb M12 with her ascent of Will Gadd’s Musashi, in the Canadian Rockies.

Sarah Hueniken on Musashi, M12 Photo Rafal Andronowski

Sarah Hueniken on Musashi, M12 Photo Rafal Andronowski

God Delusion

article continues after advertisement

Raphael Slawinski is Canada’s top technical winter climber, having proved it time and time again. In spring of 2013, Slawenski established the direct line of Man Yoga, M7+, on the Stanley Headwall, grading it a modest M8+, WI5+, the route has not been repeated.

Raphael Slawinski on God Delusion, M8+ Photo Wiktur Skupinski

Raphael Slawinski on God Delusion, M8+ Photo Wiktur Skupinski

Castles in the Sky

Sonnie Trotter found the “sweetest line” on Castle Mountain, near Lake Louise this summer. His efforts resulted in one of the hardest multi-pitch routes in Canada, Castles in the Sky, 5.14.

Castles in the Sky, Photo Sonnie Trotter

Castles in the Sky takes the prow, Photo Sonnie Trotter

The Bull

Squamish has always been the scene of cutting edge routes. Jeremy Smith’s The Bull, 5.14R, at Murrin Park, proved once again that west coast granite has much to be discovered.

Jeremy Smith on The Bull

Jeremy Smith on The Bull

Speed Record on Grand Wall

Marc Andre-Leclerc appeared on the national climbing scene this spring. A Squamish local, he applied his bold climbing and technical ability to cutting edge solos, including his Grand Wall speed-solo record.

Leclerc on Grand Wall solo Photo Kieran Brownie

Leclerc on Grand Wall solo Photo Kieran Brownie

North Twin

Hands down, the climb of the year in the Rockies was the ascent of The North Pillar of the North Twin. It was first climbed by David Cheesmond and Barry Blanchard in 1985. After 28 years and a number of attempts, North America’s two leading alpinists, Jon Walsh and Josh Wharton, climbed the 1200-metre, 5.11+, A2, for its second ascent.

North Pillar on North Twin

North Pillar on North Twin

Leslie Timms

Leslie Timms Climbed Above the Clouds, 5.13, adding a new traditional-mixed route to the classic Ontario crag, Lions Head. A fine line in great style.

Timms on Above the Clouds  Photo Glen Harris

Timms on Above the Clouds Photo Glen Harris

Zach Watson 

Zach Watson was one of Canada’s top youth competition climbers. When he moved to Thunber Bay, he climbed all of the testpiece routes. In summer, 2013, he climbed When Life Gives You Pickles, 5.13, at Mount Godfrey, one of the hardest routes within a thousand square kilometres.

Zach Watson on When Life Gives You Pickles, 5.13  Photo

Zach Watson on When Life Gives You Pickles, 5.13 Photo

Hypothenuse

In October, 2013, Quebec’s Jean-Pierre Oullet, climbed Hypothenuse, 5.13, at Val-David, one of the province’s hardest crack lines.

Oulette on Hypothenuse, 5.13

Oullet on Hypothenuse, 5.13

Sphinx Face Solo

In summer, 2013, Rockies local, Cian Brinker, boldly soloed the North Face of Mount Temple via The Sphinx Face. Graded 5.9, A2, Brinker soloed the 1,000-metre route in only a few hours, without a rope. It is the first solo of the route, which is loose and icy. The route climbs moderate ledges to steep chimneys, before topping out on the East Ridge. The North Face of Temple has been soloed via other routes such as the Greenwood/Jones, 5.10, 1,200 m, in less than three hours. Temple is considered the Eiger of the Rockies. The route has had less than 10 ascents.

The Sphinx Face climbs the snow on the left to the rock bands, where it exists just left of centre in the image Photo Barry Blanchard

The Sphinx Face climbs the snow on the left to the rock bands, where it exits just left of centre in the image Photo Barry Blanchard

Vikki Weldon on Blue Jeans

Vikki Weldon projected the Yamnuska five-pitch 5.13 sport climb for weeks before piecing it together. It was the second ascent of the route, which is one of the Rockies hardest multi-pitch.

Weldon on Blue Jeans Photo

Weldon on Blue Jeans Photo

 

Canadians Away From Home

Cory Hall on Jungdung Kangri

Canadian Cory Hall has been on an extended “road trip” which took him to the Himalaya in spring, 2013. He made the first ascent of Jungdung Kangri, 6,160 metres in Northern India with James Moneypenny.

Cory Hall on Jungdung Kangri  Photo James Moneypenny

Cory Hall on Jungdung Kangri Photo James Moneypenny

K6 West

Ian Welsted and Raphael Slawinski’s ascent of K6 West was one of the first major Canadian climbs in the Himalaya in a decade, and the first ascent of often-tried peak.

K6 West

K6 West

Sean McColl

Consistent podium finishes at a number of International competitions has landed McColl third in the world, overall.

Sean McColl

Sean McColl

Will Stanhope

Will Stanhope made the third free ascent of The Prophet, 5.14, in Yosemite. He also soloed Separate Reality, 5.12, Sentry Box, 5.12, and Zombie Roof, 5.12. He spent the majority of his summer in the Bugaboos, attempting an all-free ascent of the Tom Egan Memorial Route, which will be the hardest free route in the Bugaboos.

Stanhope between burns on The Prophet Photo Sonnie Trotter

Stanhope between burns on The Prophet Photo Sonnie Trotter

Vikki Weldon on Eulogy

Vikki Weldon made an ascent of Eulogy, 5.14, in Maple Canyon, Utah. She became the second Canadian woman to climb the grade.

Weldon on Eulogy  Photo Tom Wright

Weldon on Eulogy Photo Tom Wright

Josh Muller 

Along with being one of the strongest competitors in Canada, Josh Muller is one of the strongest boulderers, having sent King Limbs, V14, in Rocklands, South Africa.

Muller on King Limbs V14, Photo Nathan Gerhardt

Muller on King Limbs V14, Photo Nathan Gerhardt

 

 


Related