Calgary explorer Jamie Clarke and his son Khobe are about to motorbike across Mongolia and to climb Mount Khuitan, the country’s highest peak. Clarke’s wants to have himself and his son disconnect from social media in the hopes of re-connecting with each other.

Canadians are spending an average of three hours per day on their smartphones. In Scotland, doctors are actually prescribing nature to patients, and around the world, the concept of “forest bathing” is gaining monumental interest.

After summiting Mount Everest twice, climbing the world’s Seven Summits and crossing Arabia’s Empty Quarter by camel, Clarke knows a thing or two about the benefits of time spent in the outdoors.

“My kids were starting to avoid going out for real life adventures for fear of missing out on what was happening on their phones,” said Clarke. “The realization that I fed this by giving them access to smartphones from day one weighs on me heavily.”

His 18-year-old son Khobe is aware of how much he and so many other teens struggle with feeling like they always need to connect, and agrees that this kind of technological addiction is a real issue.

Some may call it “an Instagrammable trip of a lifetime,” but they will disconnect from their devices in the hopes of re-connecting with the wilds of the planet and with each other. They’ll be happy to share some images – once they’re back of course.

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