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The Turtle is New Ontario Moderate Sport Crag

Mount Nemo near Toronto

Rock climbing around Toronto goes back over 50 years, but there’s still a lot to discover and develop.

Around the corner from Mount Nemo, a group of Ontario climbers have developed a new moderate sport crag and called it The Turtle.

The climbers include Gus Alexandropoulos, Gerry Banning, Mike Sheehan, Dave Smart and Reg Smart.

The routes at The Turtle are well-bolted, clean of loose rock and are some of the most fun moderate sport routes in the area.

The climbs have fun pockets like Grassi Lakes, tufa-like holds, jugs and sharp crimps.

There’s one catch, the base of the wall is on private property and the landowner lives nearby.

Alexandropoulos wrote the following on OntarioClimbing.com: “Please refrain from yelling, dropping F-bombs or taking a dump in the forest below the cliff (would you like climbers taking a poop in your backyard?).

“Also, leave the hammocks, boom boxes, bongs and alcohol at home. Dogs must be on leash at all times. If Fido is prone to barking, consider going to another cliff. If the cliff is busy, please go to another area that can handle greater climbing traffic (Mount Nemo and Rattlesnake Point).

A 5.10 at Corner Wall at The Turtle

“The Turtle is also not suitable for large groups (that is, more than four people). To prevent erosion, climbers must stay on the main path. This is particularly important in the terraced corner area. Helmets are strongly recommended. Please bring a stick-clip and use it for every route to help prevent unnecessary injuries.

“While top-roping is acceptable (set up on lead), please refrain from monopolizing routes that other climbers would like to lead. Further route development is not allowed in this area. Finally, these rules are not negotiable.”

To download a topo and find more info to The Turtle visit Rakkup here.

To get to The Turtle, park at the new parking area at the corner of Walkers Line and #2 Side Road, which is part of the Mount Nemo Conservation Area. You’ll have to pay to park. Follow the trail up. When you reach the rock and the short step ladder, head left along the base of the rock for about 50 metres.

“Access to this cliff will be compromised if climbers ignore these policies. Don’t be the person responsible for getting this crag closed.”