Watch Jacopo Larcher make the first ascent of Tribe, likely the world’s hardest route using traditional protection. Larcher worked on the route for six years and made the first ascent last spring. He declined to grade the climb, but had climbed 5.15a in the past and said Tribe was the hardest route he’s climbed. In Canada, Larcher made a quick repeat of The Path 5.14R trad in 2018.

“It’s really hard to grade,” said Larcher about Trive. “I decided not to give it a grade. Maybe it’s my anti-style, I don’t think so, but who knows. When you try something so short and bouldery for so long, it’s tricky to grade, because when you finally send it it almost feels easy.”

Larcher was born in Merano, South Tyrol, but grew up in Bolzano. He first wore a pair of climbing shoes at the age of 11, when he participated in a youth climbing course.

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“Tribe” (E none) ~ I’m thinking since two days what I should write about this journey. After so much effort, I was sure to have too many words to describe it, but the reality is that I can’t find any. I’m simply happy, very happy. I'm thankful for what I’ve learned from it, for the the support of my friends, Babsi and the community… and yes, I’m thankful to myself, because I believed in this dream and I didn’t give up, even if it would have been easier. ~ I brushed this line 6 years ago, on my first trip to Cadarese, when I got into trad climbing. At the beginning it felt completely impossible, but I was obsessed by the beauty of the line and I kept on trying it hoping to find a solution to climb it. It had witnessed my evolution as a trad climber, as well as a lot of up and downs in my life. I kept on trying it, often alone, even if I’d never done the last two moves until a couple of weeks ago; I believed it was possible and at the end the perseverance paid off. It taught me that we always have to believe in our dreams, no matter what, even if someone tells you’re crazy and if it’s not always easy. ~ Now the big question is the grade. Everybody is asking me about it and it seems to be the most important thing about the climb, but for me it is not. I’ve never invested so much time in a route before and I believe it’s the hardest I’ve done so far, but I don’t want to reduce it to a number. It wouldn’t make any sense to me. It seems like nowadays grades are the most important things in climbing and everything else gets forgotten…but at the end of the day, what we will remember is the experience, not a number. ~ 🙏🏻 to my “Tribe” for sharing with me this process and to the climbing community for all the messages and support. It wouldn’t have been the same without you! ~ Peter, this one is for you 🙏🏻 ~ @thenorthface @lasportivagram @blackdiamond @frictionlabs @katadyn_group ~ 📸 @paolosartophoto

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