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Hazel Findlay Climbs Full Quarryman in U.K.

And listen to an interview on racism with 1960s climber Trevor Massiah

Top British climber Hazel Findlay has climbed the classic Johnny Dawes testpiece trad/mixed route The Quarryman in the Dinorwig near Llanberis in North Wales. It’s one of the most legendary multi-pitch lines in the U.K.

Findlay projected Quarryman with partner Angus Kille, who repeated it a few weeks ago, and redpointed it yesterday. In 2018, Caroline Ciavaldini became the first woman to climb the four-pitch line, in which the pitches break down to E6, E5, 8a (5.13b), 7c+ (5.13a).

Johnny Dawes made the first ascent in 1986 during the start of the slate cliff exploration days. Dawes was featured in a film called Stone Monkey in which he climbed the Groove pitch in bright 1980s tights using gymnastic-style moves to stem the box chimney.

Findlay is known for her cool head on bold climbs. In 2011, she became the first British woman to climb E9. Then in while in 2014 she became the first British woman to send 5.14b.

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In 2019, she sent Magic Line 5.14b trad in Yosemite, and over the years has ticked many 30-plus pitch big walls, including Golden Gate 5.13, Pre-Muir 5.13, Freerider 5.13 and Salathé Wall 5.13.

In Canada, Findlay has established and repeated a handful of hard trad routes, including her route Tainted Love 5.13d and Adder Crack 5.13b.

Earlier this week, Findlay interviewed Trevor Massiah on her podcast and talked about what it’s like growing up in a racist environment and to be the only climber that looks like you.

Findlay wrote on Instagram that they also discuss “living with racism today, how much (or little) racism he’s experienced within the climbing community, the concept of race as a convenient construct, why intentions matter, the ignorance of the white person to racism, the burden/responsibility being a member of a minority, the difference between racism and prejudice, education and the removal of black history, tribalism, class and racism, the current movement and why it’s long overdue.” Listen below.

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New podcast! I speak with Trevor Massiah about racism. I’ve known Trev all my life but we’ve never really spoken like this about racism. It was so eye opening to sit down with Trev and hear all the personal stories one needs to hear to be reminded that racism is still a thing. Trev has climbed for 35 years all over the world and has taught climbing for almost his entire working life. We could have talked about anything, but being black in 1965 and most likely the first British black climber gives Trev the kind of perspective few have. . . We talk about: what it’s like growing up in a racist environment, what it’s like to literally be the only climber that looks like you, living with racism today, how much (or little) racism he’s experienced within the climbing community, the concept of race as a convenient construct, why intentions matter, the ignorance of the white person to racism, the burden/responsibility being a member of a minority, the difference between racism and prejudice, education and the removal of black history, tribalism, class and racism, the current movement and why it’s long overdue. This is a sobering and honest conversation that I hope cuts through all the hashtags and small bites of info we're seeing scattered all over social media. This is only one black voice but in my mind Trev is certainly one to listen to.. Follow Trev through @rockandsun1 photos: Massiah Collection @rockandsun1 and Alun Richardson Thanks @alex__dempsey for the edit. Link in bio.

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Trevor Massiah Interview