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Canada-Based Alpinists to Attempt Mega Himalayan Wall

The north face of Kangchung Nup has been the focus of alpine climbers for over a decade. Two Japanese guides are about to make a rare attempt

Photo by: Ramsden/Hall expedition of Kangchung Shar and Kangchung Nup

Japanese alpinists and climbing guides Takeshi Tani and Toshiyuki Yamada, who are based primarily in the Canadian Rockies, are currently on route to attempt a huge north face in the Himalayas.

The two are currently approaching an area in the Khumbu region of Nepal, east of the Gokyo Glacier and in view of Mount Everest. Their plan is to attempt the first ascent of the  north face of Kangchung Nup (6,089 m). It, along with its neighbour Kangchung Shar (6,103 m), have dramatic north walls that make obvious challenges for alpine climbers.

Kangcho Nup was first climbed in 1953 and the north face was tried in 2014 by a Czech team who climbed to 5,900 metres. Read about the attempt in the American Alpine Journal here.

In 2019, the British team of Paul Ramsden and Jim Hall made attempts on Kangchung Shar and Kangchung Sup, but failed to reach a summit. The north face of Kangchung Sar was climbed in 2021, read about the ascent here.

About their attempt on Kangchung Nup, Ramsden and Hall said, “Our first objective was the amazing line of ice on the north face of Kangchung Nup. Some initial hard pitches led to a snow basin followed by more steep thin ice. After approximately 300m, finding thin ice over compact rock resulting in very poorly protected climbing we decided to retreat.”

“Ramsden and Hall said their line was very technical ice climbing in middle of the mountain,” said Yamada, who we asked about his winter in the Rockies. “My winter climbing in Canada was pretty good. I couldn’t climb some big objectives, like south face of Hector, but I got in some good training for this expedition.”

In fall 2020, Tani and Yamada established Ichinen WI5+R M4 on Storm Creek Headwall, and in 2015 they repeated the bold Rockies climb The Wild Thing, read about it here. The Japanese Alpine Club is supporting Tani and Yamada’s attempt with a $2,400 grant.

Lead photo: Ramsden/Hall expedition of Kangchung Shar and Kangchung Nup